The great cover up…

Now then dear reader, as I said in the last post we needed a cover to keep out the worst of the weather.  This couldn’t be a normal tarpaulin or sheet as it needed to fit fairly well and be designed so that we could work inside of it.  I had a word with a local sheetmaker and he gave me a price, whilst this was reasonable for the amount of material and work involved I thought there may be a better option money wise.  I did a lot of research and found a Scottish company who could supply the Regentex canvas, a company in the north that would happily supply the webbing and a firm on the south coast that supplies decent brass toothed eyelets. 

Measurements taken, sketches done and orders placed I awaited everything required to arrive.  All we then needed was a sewing machine on which to stitch it together.  A constant watch on eBay soon lead me to a Sailrite LSZ1 portable machine.  It just so happened that it was being sold by another lugger owner, (he owns Veracity) a few emails back and forth had it winging its way to us. 😉 With everything in one place it was time to start cutting and sewing the canvas into a cover.  This developed into a HUGE job, needing three of us just to pass the canvass through the sewing machine each time!  Each seam had to be sewn twice so it was backwards and forwards, backwards and forwards.  With each pass it got heavier and more bulky to handle.  After a LOT of work it was done and taken to the boat a bit at a time to check the fit and make any adjustments needed. 

It’s not quite a perfect fit, but not bad for a first go!

(Just as a side note the Sailrite sewing machine is a fantastic bit of kit!)

I also need to say a huge thank you to my mother, without her help (and livingroom floor) It wood have been very difficult indeed to make 😉

Let the demolition commence ;-)…

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The work begins…

The following few days passed in a bit of a blurry state due to lack of sleep and suchlike.  We moved the OP to another berth the following day and she thankfully sat much better indeed.

I then had to come up with a list of jobs and some sort of vaguely logical order for them to be tackled in.  This took many sheets of paper untill I had a rough plan.  It had already been decided that the cabin and wheelhouse had to be removed as they were both rotten to such an extent as being beyond repair.  The wheelhouse was also ‘not spoilt by its beauty’.  It was too low to be able to steer from and had one exit to the starboard side that claimed more than it’s fair share of my scalp en-route back from Penzance!

We also were going to strip the interior as this in no way suited our needs and was also rotten in many places.  But first, we needed a cover to keep things dry (ish) whilst there was no lid on the boat…

The first night…

Having arrived and had a modest celebration we wnt home to get cleaned up and then Trish and I returned to the OP to watch her down on the tide. This is where the problems started.  As she took the ground there wasn’t enough mud on the outside of her and she started to lean out.  She ended up at about 45-50 degrees list to port! This was not ‘ideal’ as we ended up having to sleep across the boat and were almost standing up!  At this point I think Trish was even less impressed than on her first viewing.  Here she was the proud new owner of a stinking, dirty, uncomfortable boat that didn’t even have the ability to be level to sleep on! I’m sure the phrase ‘not impressed’ would suffice at this point! In some ways it was good that Trish couldn’t even get off as it was a good 10ft to the ladder so she had to stay aboard.  The morning did seem a long time comming though…

All round, not a happy situation.  It odes get better though so keep reading 😉